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Boys: Understanding rough and tumble play

Speaker, author and academic Dr Michael Nagel, continues his exploration of gender differences with a closer look at boys’ behaviour and the desire for rough and tumble play, giving us a greater appreciation for how we parent and educate our sons.

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Report warns against physical discipline

A report from the American Academy of Paediatrics finds that parents should not use corporal punishment as it can be associated with aggressive behaviour in a child and make it more likely that children will be defiant or aggressive in the future.

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Why boys wrestle, play fight and fidget

Science tells us that because of their biological makeup, sitting still is just not an easy proposition for boys. Whether you have a boy or a girl you may have wondered what science can tell you about the brain's role in shaping your child's behaviour.

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Bringing up girls: Biology and behaviour

Whether you have a boy or a girl you may have wondered what science can tell you about the brain's role in shaping behaviour. There is evidence suggesting that the physiology of the female brain plays a tremendous role in how girls behave and learn.

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How and when to teach your child to share

The concept of sharing is something most parents try to instil in their children from a young age and while it sounds simple, it’s quite a complex life skill for children to master.

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Coping with sibling rivalry and conflict

Sibling rivalry is often about gender, position order, stage and age of development. Child psychologist Dr Fiona Martin believes the most effective way for parents to cope with this challenging sibling conflict is through fostering ‘positive play.’

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Tantrums, defiance and how to respond

All parents experience the challenges associated with their children being ‘oppositional’, it’s the extent of the problems that indicate whether the child’s tantrums or defiance go beyond what you should expect from your average toddler or preschooler.

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The role of childhood comfort objects

While they are formally known as transitional objects, a child's favourite blankie, toy or comfort object is a side effect of their broader developmental need - a companion to talk to, to go to sleep with, or eat with when separating from their parents.

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