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Coping with sibling rivalry and conflict

Sibling rivalry is often about gender, position order, stage and age of development. Child psychologist Dr Fiona Martin believes the most effective way for parents to cope with this challenging sibling conflict is through fostering ‘positive play.’  

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Snapshot of Australian Families

Happy (54%) and stressed (36%) were the two words parents felt best described family life.

31.3% of families are only able to find time to eat breakfast together on weekends.

53% of parents believe they spend less time with their children than their parents spent with them.

40% of parents have struggled to meet essential expenses over the past 12 months.

Little girl on lying on the floor
Many parents struggle with their children’s behaviour. Some kids are hard to parent and there is nothing to be ashamed of. There is nothing wrong with seeking help if you are stuck in the same aggressive cycle. Seeking help is a good thing.
Professor Mark Dadds

Tantrums, defiance and how to respond

All parents experience the challenges associated with their children being ‘oppositional’, it’s the extent of the problems that indicate whether the child’s tantrums or defiance go beyond what you should expect from your average toddler or pre-schooler.

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Why play is more than just good fun

The verdict is in. Play is more than just fun. There’s a growing evidence base that play is critically important in promoting safe, stable and nurturing relationships and in encouraging development of children’s future executive functioning skills.

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Physical discipline and parent attitudes

A Royal Children’s Hospital poll has found a significant proportion of Australian parents hold attitudes and beliefs in support of physical discipline, but at the same time the vast majority use positive tactics to promote children's good behaviour.

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How mental health impacts on learning

Some children start school with anxieties or behaviour problems, making it hard for them to focus on learning in the classroom. Australian researchers have found a link between the mental health of five year olds and their ability to learn at school.

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Why conversations with toddlers matter

Talking about what your child is playing with and following their lead in conversation helps them to learn language. Research shows the more times mums and toddlers can do this, the better the toddlers’ language skills were at the time and one year later.

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Brain scans predict variations in ADHD

Using neuroimaging techniques, The Children’s Attention Project at Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, has found that distinct brain patterns can help explain variations in the way children present with Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

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How to talk to children about death

From a very young age children are introduced to the themes of loss in picture books, video games, and popular children’s movies, but often adults find questions about death and dying challenging. One common question is “what on earth do I say?”.

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Babble On

Don’t be afraid to babble. When your child starts to make noises, treat it like a real conversation and mimic the sounds right back. See how many times you can go back and forth!

All kinds of “conversations” help to build children’s brains—even when they’re still learning how to talk. By following your child’s lead and responding, you spark the connections he/she needs for language and communication later on.

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Vroom uses the science of early learning to help your child thrive with bite-sized activities that support brain growth.