Skip to main navigation Skip to main content
Please enter a search term

Homepage

Parents often share many of the same challenges when raising their child. First Five Years gives parents the expert advice, insights, support and tools they need to make the most of the first years of their child’s life.

Read more

Feature

Bluey

Bluey: Children's favourite Blue Heeler

Since launching late last year, the animated adventures of Bluey the irrepressible six year-old Blue Heeler have become a huge hit with Australian children and their parents. But behind the laughter Bluey reminds both parents and children about the vital skill for young children: play.

Read more

Snapshot of Australian Families

Emotions

Parent’s emotions are quite a contrast. The two words parents felt best described family life over the previous three months were happy 49% (↓ from 54%) and stressed 39% (↑ from 36%).

Meals

31.8% of families only eat breakfast together on weekends. However 11% (↓ from 12%) of families never eat breakfast together.

Family Time

48% (↓ from 53%) of parents believe they spend less time with their children than their parents spent with them.

Expenses

39% (↓ from 40%) of parents have struggled to meet essential expenses like food, mortgage/rent, utility bills, child care or important medical care over the past 12 months.

Parent and child walking through school or early learning centre
I really, really want you to see that there is a beautiful person, worthy of friendship and acceptance underneath the behaviours that push others away. I hope you can make the time to see that wonderful, big-hearted child, that is so rarely seen or acknowledged.
Lauren Lloyd

What I want you to know about my child

The mother of a child who displays big behaviours gives a rare glimpse inside her life in a raw open letter, revealing how it feels for her child to receive disapproving looks and comments and urges others to take a moment to see her child differently.

Read more

Child safety around the home: Checklist

The home is the most common place for young children to be injured, but many injuries are predictable and preventable. To make the home environment as safe as possible we spoke to two experts to provide their useful tips on keeping children safe.

Read more

Understanding left and right handedness

Left handed people often find the world is oriented toward right-handedness. Whether it's can openers, scissors, computers, or vegie peelers, there's often a right-handed bias. But what is the science and statistics behind left and right-handedness?

Read more

How to build quality family relationships

Children’s most important early relationships are with parents. Positive parent-child relationships are important for a child’s development. By switching off devices and appreciating simple things you can strengthen your relationship with your child.

Read more

The truth about parenting an only child

Proponents of larger families claim 'only children' may be spoiled, lonely, or selfish. But science shows this is wrong. Known as 'only child syndrome' research now suggests there is no difference and there may even be benefits to being an only child.

Read more

Premature birth and the link to ADHD

Children born very preterm are showing rates of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), three times higher than the general population, studies are showing, however monitoring can assist health care professionals with early intervention.

Read more

Dealing with fussiness and food refusal

It’s not unusual for parents to dread mealtimes, worrying that their child will cry and fuss when being offered new foods. But it’s important to recognise the shift in interest around food may be closely aligned with the child’s growing independence.

Read more

In The Bag

Before you go to an appointment, grab some safe things for your child to play with and put them in a bag. While you’re waiting, reach into the bag and talk about what you find. “This is a teething ring for you to chew on. Here’s a rattle for you to hold. Let’s shake it!”

Talking about what’s In the Bag is interesting to your child and will help him/her build his/her vocabulary and his/her brain. Speak in full sentences. It's okay to use words that your child doesn't know yet. That's how he/she learns!

 

See all tips
Vroom uses the science of early learning to help your child thrive with bite-sized activities that support brain growth.