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Adventurous play: Why children need risk

Is there a reason our children insist on walking on the very edge of a footpath, instead of the middle? Or can’t resist climbing a wall or a tall tree? According to researchers, who define this play as risky or adventurous play, the answer is yes. 

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Snapshot of Australian Families

Happy (54%) and stressed (36%) were the two words parents felt best described family life.

31.3% of families are only able to find time to eat breakfast together on weekends.

53% of parents believe they spend less time with their children than their parents spent with them.

40% of parents have struggled to meet essential expenses over the past 12 months.

Mother and daughter reading
Young children have no difficulty talking about the names of dinosaurs or characteristics of superheroes. Children love to be taken on an enjoyable journey into books that are too hard for them to read independently.
Dr Susan Ledger

Why repetitive reading helps your child

While even the most welcome book can wear out its welcome when your child insists on reading it over and over again each evening, it may help to know that rhyme, rhythm and repetition are all contributing a vital part to your child’s learning journey.

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Helping your child through troubled times

In her new book psychologist Collett Smart arms parents with the tools to build strong families and tackles the difficult topics facing teens and tweens, but she warns the building blocks for success begin with our babies, toddlers and preschoolers.

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Should you reward children with food?

Does making children eat all their dinner to get dessert work, or just leave them with an unhealthy relationship with food? Dietitian Konsita Kuswara provides advice on rewarding or punishing children with food and the impact on their behaviour and preferences.

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Why spend one-on-one time with your child

Interested in boosting your child’s self-confidence, brain development, language and social skills? More one-on-one time may be part of the answer, contributing numerous benefits to a child's development according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

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Childhood physical activity in crisis

A global report on children’s physical activity comparing 49 countries, has found Australian children aren't moving enough. The country is lagging on Overall Physical Activity, Active Transport, Screen Time and Physical Fitness, with a grade of D-.

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When fear and anxiety drives parenting

It’s not unusual for parents to feel anxious from time to time. What are the signs you may have become overly anxious or fearful and what can you do to help yourself and your child? Psychologist Dr Judith Locke provides helpful parenting suggestions.

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Growing up with a special needs sibling

Being raised with a brother or sister with significant disabilities can bring benefits including opportunities to learn resilience and empathy at a very young age. However, it also brings with it some challenges for both the children and the parents.

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In The Bag

Before you go to an appointment, grab some safe things for your child to play with and put them in a bag. While you’re waiting, reach into the bag and talk about what you find. “This is a teething ring for you to chew on. Here’s a rattle for you to hold. Let’s shake it!”

Talking about what’s In the Bag is interesting to your child and will help him/her build his/her vocabulary and his/her brain. Speak in full sentences. It's okay to use words that your child doesn't know yet. That's how he/she learns!

 

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Vroom uses the science of early learning to help your child thrive with bite-sized activities that support brain growth.