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Toddler sleeping with toy monkey

The role of childhood comfort objects

While they are formally known as transitional objects, a child's favourite blankie, toy or comfort object is a side effect of their broader developmental need - a companion to talk to, to go to sleep with, or eat with when separating from their parents.

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Snapshot of Australian Families

Happy (54%) and stressed (36%) were the two words parents felt best described family life.

31.3% of families are only able to find time to eat breakfast together on weekends.

53% of parents believe they spend less time with their children than their parents spent with them.

40% of parents have struggled to meet essential expenses over the past 12 months.

Tired man waking up in the morning
Men in gender equal societies are healthier, happier, less risky and sleep better. That’s great for men. Research shows that women in more gender equal societies have more equal division of housework and childcare and sleep better, so men are getting benefits in terms of their health, women are getting benefits in terms of their time.
Dr Leah Ruppanner

Why gender equality supports better sleep

The ‘zombie effect’ of sleep deprivation can surprise new parents and interfere with work and family life. However, researchers have found that sleep is gendered and both the average woman and man sleep better when living in gender-equal countries.

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5 childhood illnesses: A parent's guide

Whether it’s ear infections, coughs, colds, stomach bugs or something more serious, it’s helpful for parents and carers to know the signs and symptoms and when to seek medical attention. Dr Ryan Harvey outlines five childhood illnesses to be aware of.

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Working mums: Your children will be happy

Employed mothers can relax. Harvard Business School research suggests that the children of working mothers are just as happy in adulthood as the children of stay-at-home mums, and that their adult daughters are more likely to have higher earnings.

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Are you helping raise SunSmart children?

Sun protection is an essential life skill for any child growing up in Australia. Infants and toddlers up to four years of age are particularly vulnerable to UV damage. Two in three Australians will develop some form of skin cancer over their lifetime.

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Preschool bullying: How parents can help

In a Royal Children’s Hospital poll, one in five Australian parents report one or more of their children was bullied. Paediatrician Dr Anthea Rhodes, says bullying is serious and common, harming the physical, social and emotional wellbeing of children.

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How to choose an early learning centre

It’s understandable that families can be anxious about making the right decision about early learning and care for their little ones. Early childhood professional Dr Lesley Jones guides parents on what to look for in a high quality early learning centre.

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Why toddlers bite and what to do

Biting can be a normal part of exploring their environment and a response to under-developed toddler communication skills. This doesn’t make it okay, however understanding why children bite and arming yourself with strategies can relieve a lot of stress.

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Babble On

Don’t be afraid to babble. When your child starts to make noises, treat it like a real conversation and mimic the sounds right back. See how many times you can go back and forth!

All kinds of “conversations” help to build children’s brains—even when they’re still learning how to talk. By following your child’s lead and responding, you spark the connections he/she needs for language and communication later on.

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Vroom uses the science of early learning to help your child thrive with bite-sized activities that support brain growth.