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Tips for helping children learn to read

Research into reading aloud shows more than half of children are not being read to at home, leading to calls for parents to keep reading aloud to children. Dr Susan Ledger says when teaching reading, we need to understand how children read.

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Why conversations with toddlers matter

Talking about what your child is playing with and following their lead in conversation helps them to learn language. Research shows the more times mums and toddlers can do this, the better the toddlers’ language skills were at the time and one year later.

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Building language through conversation

Cognitive scientists believe that conversations between a parent and a child, known as 'conversational turns', appear to influence the biological growth of the brain, and this back-and-forth conversation is actually critical to language development.

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Household chores help children learn

How many times have you written a shopping list or read recipes without a second thought? Researchers at Macquarie University have discovered that verbalising the processes you go through every day in your household could help your child read and write.

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How to fill the '30 million word gap'

A study called the 30 million word gap reports children from lower-income families hear 30 million fewer words than those from higher-income families by age three. The more words your child hears, the more they’ll know; so speak to them early and often.

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Why Dads should read with their children

Australian researchers have found that when fathers read to their children at home, the child’s language development increases as they grow older. Dr Jon Quach says the research fills blanks on the role of fathers in supporting language development.

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ELLA offers play-based language learning

In preschools across Australia, the Early Learning Language Australia (ELLA) program is helping more than 80,000 children become comfortable with learning a different language early in life, using a fun, digital, play-based language learning program.

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Why you need to talk to your baby

Through the random noises of the outside world and the beating heart and growling stomach of their mothers, babies are distinguishing the muffled sound of their mother’s voice. From the third trimester children naturally develop speech and language.

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