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Articles about Newborn & infancy

Why play is more than just good fun

The verdict is in. Play is more than just fun. There’s a growing evidence base that play is critically important in promoting safe, stable and nurturing relationships and in encouraging development of children’s future executive functioning skills.

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5 childhood illnesses: A parent's guide

Whether it’s ear infections, coughs, colds, stomach bugs or something more serious, it’s helpful for parents and carers to know the signs and symptoms and when to seek medical attention. Dr Ryan Harvey outlines five childhood illnesses to be aware of.

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Building language through conversation

Cognitive scientists believe that conversations between a parent and a child, known as 'conversational turns', appear to influence the biological growth of the brain, and this back-and-forth conversation is actually critical to language development.

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How to fill the '30 million word gap'

A study called the 30 million word gap reports children from lower-income families hear 30 million fewer words than those from higher-income families by age three. The more words your child hears, the more they’ll know; so speak to them early and often.

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Tresillian tips for sleep and settling

Registered nurse and midwife Fran Chavasse says too many people mistakenly believe that children can learn to sleep at any age. However, children don’t learn to sleep. Sleep is a developmental process like walking and talking and it happens over time.

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Child development: the first 1000 days

Fascinating research suggests that starting from conception, a foetus responds to changes in environment, using cues provided by the mother’s physical and mental state to ‘predict’ the kind of world they'll be born into and altering their bodily structures.

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Why you need to talk to your baby

Through the random noises of the outside world and the beating heart and growling stomach of their mothers, babies are distinguishing the muffled sound of their mother’s voice. From the third trimester children naturally develop speech and language.

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Baby talk: Learn how to talk to your baby

While we cringe at “coochy coo” baby talk, research shows that it is not just the simplified words and frequent repetition that makes baby talk attractive to babies, but rather the sounds and its characteristic structure, rhythm and use of emotion.

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