Skip to main navigation Skip to main content
Please enter a search term

Filter by:

Little boy playing with an abacus

Quality programs for birth to threes

Many parents are anxious about sending very young children to a long-day-care centre. Professor of Early Childhood Sheila Degotardi answers the questions: Should parents be worried? What does research tell us about the impact on very young children?

Read more

Boy building with wooden blocks

Giving children the best start in life

Research shows one in five Australian children are starting school developmentally vulnerable. The Australian Research Alliance for Children & Youth is leading a project to ensure every child starts school ready to learn, engage and face challenges.

Read more

Children playing on floor with toys

Why play is more than just good fun

The verdict is in. Play is more than just fun. There’s a growing evidence base that play is critically important in promoting safe, stable and nurturing relationships and in encouraging development of children’s future executive functioning skills.

Read more

Baby and toy - First 1000 days of life

Child development: the first 1000 days

Fascinating research suggests that starting from conception, a foetus responds to changes in environment, using cues provided by the mother’s physical and mental state to ‘predict’ the kind of world they'll be born into and altering their bodily structures.

Read more

Pregnant mother reading

Why you need to talk to your baby

Through the random noises of the outside world and the beating heart and growling stomach of their mothers, babies are distinguishing the muffled sound of their mother’s voice. From the third trimester children naturally develop speech and language.

Read more

Father and baby - Credit: iStock.com/LiudmylaSupynska

Baby talk: Learn how to talk to your baby

While we cringe at “coochy coo” baby talk, research shows that it is not just the simplified words and frequent repetition that makes baby talk attractive to babies, but rather the sounds and its characteristic structure, rhythm and use of emotion.

Read more

Multicultural family

Building better brains with bilingualism

As adults, we fail to wrap our tongue around unfamiliar nasal vowels, guttural sounds or the nuances of tonal languages, while children slip effortlessly between languages. Until the age of seven, children are geniuses at acquiring a second language.

Read more

Music a key to childhood learning

Give a child a pot, a pan and a wooden spoon – or even their own hands, feet and voice – and music can be made. As well as the intellectual and academic benefits, music is enabling children to identify, understand and, to a degree, process emotions.

Read more

Find more articles by tag