Skip to main navigation Skip to main content
Please enter a search term
  • Home /
  • Home learning

Share

Articles about Home learning

The value of play to literacy and numeracy

Children may learn to recognise letters and numbers by repetition and copying, but exploring their world through play where a stick represents a horse or a plate is a hat, forms foundations for abstract thinking in literacy, maths and problem solving.

Read more

Why repetitive reading helps your child

While even the most welcome book can wear out its welcome when your child insists on reading it over and over again each evening, it may help to know that rhyme, rhythm and repetition are all contributing a vital part to your child’s learning journey.

Read more

The importance and benefits of free play

In an effort to give children the best possible start in life it is possible to fill every spare moment with activities. This does however put pressure on parents and risks leaving little time for vital play, an important part of brain development.

Read more

Perseverance: Teaching the value of effort

Learning to persevere is an important skill for children to learn and researchers have found parents play a very valuable role in modelling the behaviour. It’s all about trying, failing, and if you are a parent, being seen to fail without giving up.

Read more

Reading to kids: Quality over quantity

We have long known that reading is good for children, but research has now gone a step further and figured out how to ensure that the time we spend reading to our children is having the best possible effect on their brain development. Find out how.

Read more

Why play is more than just good fun

The verdict is in. Play is more than just fun. There’s a growing evidence base that play is critically important in promoting safe, stable and nurturing relationships and in encouraging development of children’s future executive functioning skills.

Read more

Household chores help children learn

How many times have you written a shopping list or read recipes without a second thought? Researchers at Macquarie University have discovered that verbalising the processes you go through every day in your household could help your child read and write.

Read more

Child development: the first 1000 days

Fascinating research suggests that starting from conception, a foetus responds to changes in environment, using cues provided by the mother’s physical and mental state to ‘predict’ the kind of world they'll be born into and altering their bodily structures.

Read more