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Why talking to your baby or child matters

The world of the young child is exciting. Research tells us the importance of early communication and the need for children to experiment with sounds, babbling, making noises, learning vocabulary, and communicating from as early an age as possible.

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Why repetitive reading helps your child

While even the most welcome book can wear out its welcome when your child insists on reading it over and over again each evening, it may help to know that rhyme, rhythm and repetition are all contributing a vital part to your child’s learning journey.

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Reading to kids: Quality over quantity

We have long known that reading is good for children, but research has now gone a step further and figured out how to ensure that the time we spend reading to our children is having the best possible effect on their brain development. Find out how.

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Building language through conversation

Cognitive scientists believe that conversations between a parent and a child, known as 'conversational turns', appear to influence the biological growth of the brain, and this back-and-forth conversation is actually critical to language development.

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Household chores help children learn

How many times have you written a shopping list or read recipes without a second thought? Researchers at Macquarie University have discovered that verbalising the processes you go through every day in your household could help your child read and write.

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How to fill the '30 million word gap'

A study called the 30 million word gap reports children from lower-income families hear 30 million fewer words than those from higher-income families by age three. The more words your child hears, the more they’ll know; so speak to them early and often.

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Why you need to talk to your baby

Through the random noises of the outside world and the beating heart and growling stomach of their mothers, babies are distinguishing the muffled sound of their mother’s voice. From the third trimester children naturally develop speech and language.

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Baby talk: Learn how to talk to your baby

While we cringe at “coochy coo” baby talk, research shows that it is not just the simplified words and frequent repetition that makes baby talk attractive to babies, but rather the sounds and its characteristic structure, rhythm and use of emotion.

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