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Articles about Literacy

The role of parents and home learning

Dr Kate Liley highlights the importance of the home learning environment in supporting children’s development. She discusses how it features strongly in research as being key to children’s language, physical, intellectual and social development.

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The value of play to literacy and numeracy

Children may learn to recognise letters and numbers by repetition and copying, but exploring their world through play where a stick represents a horse or a plate is a hat, forms foundations for abstract thinking in literacy, maths and problem solving.

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Why talking to your baby or child matters

The world of the young child is exciting. Research tells us the importance of early communication and the need for children to experiment with sounds, babbling, making noises, learning vocabulary, and communicating from as early an age as possible.

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Why repetitive reading helps your child

While even the most welcome book can wear out its welcome when your child insists on reading it over and over again each evening, it may help to know that rhyme, rhythm and repetition are all contributing a vital part to your child’s learning journey.

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Why boys wrestle, play fight and fidget

Science tells us that because of their biological makeup, sitting still is just not an easy proposition for boys. Whether you have a boy or a girl you may have wondered what science can tell you about the brain's role in shaping your child's behaviour.

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Bringing up girls: Biology and behaviour

Whether you have a boy or a girl you may have wondered what science can tell you about the brain's role in shaping behaviour. There is evidence suggesting that the physiology of the female brain plays a tremendous role in how girls behave and learn.

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School readiness: How can parents tell?

Is your child ready for school? The problem with that question, Professor Frank Oberklaid, OAM, says, is that there is no single correct answer, partly because at age four or five there is still quite a bit of variability in children's development.

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Reading to kids: Quality over quantity

We have long known that reading is good for children, but research has now gone a step further and figured out how to ensure that the time we spend reading to our children is having the best possible effect on their brain development. Find out how.

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